Shell Shock: Break Down in WWI. Now they are free.

Well, before facing this topic I have been meditating and taking time for breathing, alone, in the woods. This is one of the most sensitive subject I am still willing to write about. For the side story, I am one of those who experienced panic attacks and tremors, neurosthenia, physical and mental break down, which led to occupational burn out, as a consequence of « Paris Terror », in january and november 2015. Still dealing with the aftermath. But I am confident, and I will sort it out or bust. By the way, I lived a « fake alert », while terrorists were around … Continue reading Shell Shock: Break Down in WWI. Now they are free.

All quiet on the Western Front.

Special effects are far from more recent ones, but once you finish this movie, you feel like you lost a friend. Or more. Shell shock is quickly seen on a scene on the front. Face to face combat takes the stage. And dead bodies. This book was one of my first on the WWI, as teenager. It still haunts me, over 40. Minute 2:16:00 “But I know now, I should never come back. Out there all the things that I do, there is no other meaning of life, cos it has no meaning. My companion at the front are the … Continue reading All quiet on the Western Front.

PTSD in WWI so-called “shell shock”: Coward. Sensitive beware.

“COWARD” is a 28 minute film set during World War 1 that brings to light some of the brutal treatment soldiers received for suffering what would now be known as shell-shock. It follows two cousins, Andrew and James, from their home in Northern Ireland who join the British Army to fight for their Country and make their families proud. Through their eyes we see the reality of life on the front lines. Continue reading PTSD in WWI so-called “shell shock”: Coward. Sensitive beware.

Anna Coleman Ladd, dignity and face masks.

Originally posted on to work as a sculptor:
“Triton Babies” in the Boston Public Garden Anna Coleman Watts Ladd (1878 – 1939) was an American sculptor in the Boston area who devoted her time throughout World War I to soldiers who were disfigured. Anna Coleman Watts was born in Philadelphia and educated in Europe, where she studied sculpture in Paris and Rome. She moved to Boston in 1905 when she married Dr. Maynard Ladd, and there studied with Bela Pratt for three years at the Boston Museum School. “Triton Babies” (shown here, now a fountain in Boston’s Public Garden) was… Continue reading Anna Coleman Ladd, dignity and face masks.