Making horror Something Beautiful. Bonjour, Paris.

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Parisian Suburbs
The blanket that you can see in this picture is my crocheting during november 2015. Yes, in that weekend of blank and fear, and loss (I lost my colleague on 14th for a stroke), my first thought was put off all telephones, facebook, medias and concentrate on crocheting colourful wool.
The final result is not what I expected or hoped for, and I admit that the blanket is not properly squared like it should in the pattern.
Never mind! Crocheting is what I go back to when I need a rest from outworlds occupations and worries.
Well, I finally included a slide of these people – 13th november Paris attack’s Survivors – in my Project’s Page. It took me a while to include pictures of real facts. As you can notice, I carefully avoid to put blood and pulp stuff about the events I am refering to for respect to victims and survivors.
Yes, respect. Since I am neither a journalist nor a cannibal.

Btw my personal tatoo is Justice symbol and it’s obviously the logo of this website.

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Bataclan survivors' tattoos show their pain and defiance

From top left: Ludmila Profit, 24; David Fritz Goeppinger, 25; Stephanie Zarev, 44, and Laura Leveque, 32. All were at the Bataclan concert hall on November 13, 2015. Photos: Joel Saget/AFP

Since she was “buried” under the dead and dying at the Bataclan concert hall, Laura Leveque has “carried 130 corpses” on her shoulders. “So I may as well mark it,” she said.
Like dozens of other survivors of the November 13 Paris attacks, Leveque got herself tattooed.
“I was soaked in blood and flesh. The dead seeped into me,” she told AFP.
But tattoos have helped the 32-year-old — who says that even two years after the attack she still feels “in limbo”  – to get her “body back and transform the horror into something beautiful.”
Now Leveque carries a raven on her shoulder surrounded by smaller tattoos of an eclipse, a snake biting its own tail to symbolise the “cycle or life”, and “flowers growing on a battlefield”.

Laura Leveque, 32, who was at the Bataclan concert hall on November 13, 2015, shows her tattoo - a raven, an eclipse and a snake biting its tail. Photo: Joel Saget/AFP
Laura Leveque, 32, who was at the Bataclan concert hall on November 13, 2015, shows her tattoo – a raven, an eclipse and a snake biting its tail. Photo: Joel Saget/AFP

Three months after she survived the slaughter, Nahomy Beuchet had the date of the attack and “Peace, Love, Death Metal” tattooed on the inside of her arm.
That’s the title of an album by Eagles of Death Metal, the Californian band who were onstage at the Bataclan when the gunmen burst in and began the massacre of 90 people.
For the 21-year-old, for whom time is now “a little abstract”, the tattoo is “a historical anchor”.

‘This is my scar’

“This is my scar,” says Manon Hautecoeur of her lion tattoo and the motto of Paris — “Fluctuat nec mergitur” (Battered but not sunk) — which became a defiant slogan after the attacks.
“When you are ‘only’ psychologically hurt you feel you are not a victim because you were not physically injured,” said the young woman, who was close to the Petit Cambodge restaurant when it was sprayed with bullets in one of the drive-by attacks by jihadists that night that claimed an additional 39 lives.
David Fritz Goeppinger, who survived the Bataclan, said he feels the same way.
“I didn’t have a wound. I needed something,” the 25-year-old said of his tattoo of the date in roman numerals.
Alexandra, one of several survivors who preferred to give only her first name, was shot in the elbow at the Carillon bar opposite the Petit Cambodge. She had “Fluctuat nec mergitur” tattooed as close as she could to the wound.
Ruben, who spent six months in hospital, also had the motto tattooed on his arm. “Without having a big sign saying, ‘I was at the Bataclan,’ I wanted to mark it,” he said.
“Being tattooed is a way of getting yourself a new skin, metamorphosing,” said David le Breton, a sociologist who specialises in body art. It allows people “to reclaim what happened, to honour those who died and the emotional impact of having passed so close to death.” Often the tattoos also mark “inner scars”, he added.
Stephanie Zarev, 44, had a phoenix tattooed on her arm where she was hit by shrapnel, to show that “despite the horror of that night, there’s lots to live for.”
David Fritz Goeppinger, 25, who was at the Bataclan concert hall on November 13, 2015, shows his tattoo - the date of the attack in Roman numerals, adding V/V meaning they were five friends before and after the attack. Photo: Joel Saget/AFP

David Fritz Goeppinger, 25, who was at the Bataclan concert hall on November 13, 2015, shows his tattoo – the date of the attack in Roman numerals, adding V/V meaning they were five friends before and after the attack. Photo: Joel Saget/AFP

‘Illuminate my wounds’

Sophie took two bullets in her leg and now cannot move her foot. She covered her thigh with a huge Mexican Day of the Dead “Catrina” skeleton lady, adding a sunflower tattoo on her foot.
“I did not want to sublimate my wounds, I wanted to illuminate” them, the 33-year-old said.
Maureen, who has been working on a photo book on the tattoos with the Life for Paris survivors group, took her time before deciding to get one herself on her side. It reads, “Survive: to be reborn, to grow and to die later.”
Floriane Beaulieu will never forget how lucky she was to get out of the Bataclan, which was why she went for a four-leaf clover, a dove and “the word ‘hope’ written inside an infinity sign”.
“It was Friday the 13th, there were 13 of us in the mosh pit in front of the stage, and we all got out alive,” recalled Ludmila Profit, 24, who had the number tattooed inside a clover leaf behind her ear.
She added a musical note and “the word fuck, to say ‘Fuck the terrorists'” — to show her pride and defiance “at being able to live for those who are no longer here.”
Those who lost family members have also gone under the needle. Florence Ancellin had a carrot put on her ankle, the nickname of her daughter Caroline, who was 24 when she died in the Bataclan.

Fanny, who lost her partner Olivier at the Bataclan concert hall on November 13, 2015, shows her tattoo - the words
Fanny, who lost her partner Olivier at the Bataclan concert hall on November 13, 2015, shows her tattoo – the words “Sometimes you need …to let things go”. Photo: Joel Saget/AFP

Maryline Le Guen’s three sons — aged 15 to 29 —  all went to the concert. The eldest, Renaud, did not come home. A month later she got an arabesque tattoo of his name “so I could always have him with me”.
Fanny Proville, who lost her partner Olivier, reacted a little differently, and had “Sometimes you need to let things go” tattooed on her back.
“I know he is there,” she said, “even if he is not.”
By AFP’s Marie Giffard 

With courtesy of The local.fr

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Terror victims study proves our resilience.

Floral tributes outside the Bataclan Theatre in memory of the victims of the Paris attacks1

Floral tributes outside the Bataclan Theatre in memory of the victims of the Paris attacks

Patricia Casey

On Friday, November 13 2015, a series of terror attacks erupted in Paris. They were mercilessly launched on people gathered at various social outlets and events in order to maximise the carnage. A football match was the first target in this co-ordinated killing spree. This was followed by shootings at restaurants and cafes and finally a metal concert in the Bataclan Theatre. Hostages were taken there also. A total of 130 lost their lives and over 4,000 were injured, almost 100 seriously. These were the most serious attacks on the city since WWII. Isis claimed responsibility.

It is no surprise that the impact of these attacks on the psyche of those involved, both directly as victims and less directly as observers, has been studied in depth by psychiatrists and psychologists, as have attacks in other locations. The London bombing and 9/11 attacks in New York have both generated large volumes of research information. In the April issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry, a paper exploring the impact of the Paris attacks, headed by Dr Stephanie Vandentorren, of the French Public Health Agency, has been published.

Two groups were studied. First responders were fire officers, rescue workers and so on exposed during the first 12 hours after the events. The second group were witnesses – those who were themselves under threat of being killed, held hostage or injured or had seen somebody in that position, or heard of a close relative in that predicament. These could be either directly exposed or have witnessed them from their homes. Seeing these events only on the media did not constitute exposure. Various face-to-face structured interviews were administered and over 400 people were interviewed.

Among rescue workers, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was diagnosed in 3pc and an anxiety disorder in 14pc. Among civilian witnesses, more than 15pc were significantly distressed, 25pc had possible PTSD, while 18pc were diagnosed definitively with it, and 10pc had depression. As expected, those indirectly threatened had lower levels than close relatives of victims, and the highest rates of mental health problems was in those directly threatened.

Almost half of civilians had more than six months treatment for a mental health problem, compared with a third of first responders. However, most had returned to work six months after the attack. These results show that first responders had lower rates of mental health problems than civilians and they required less professional help.

This study shows that people witnessing traumatic events are more vulnerable to mental health problems than are first responders. It may be that the training those in rescue and first response teams receive helps them withstand the distress of their direct involvement. It is also likely that if they had concerns about mental health difficulties developing after the attacks, they pro-actively sought help as a preventative measure and needed it for a shorter period.

During their training, they will have been made aware of the help that it available should they ever require it. Civilians on the other hand may feel less entitlement to such help and may defer seeking it until their distress is much more incapacitating.

The positive finding, that all but 6pc returned to work, shows the power of healing. Similar results were described following the 9/11 bombings and the London attacks. Either time or therapy seems to have benefited those who were suffering in the aftermath. This surely proves the resilience that human beings are endowed with, enabling them to deal with major traumas and to emerge from the quagmire of distress that engulfed them.

Resilience is determined by several factors. The personality of each individual is probably the single most important element, while the presence of support from family, friends and the community is next. Having a person to talk to is undoubtedly beneficial. The scientific literature on resilience has been developing in recent years and it also describes the value of positive coping, religious coping, having a sense of purpose in life, and altruism.

It is comforting to know we are not long-term victims of the events that befall us. Rather, we are strong and can emerge from the suffering of terrible events with more compassion and a better understanding of life.

With Courtesy of The Indipendent.ie

Soldier’s woundwort, if Achille suffered from PTSD, anyone can do.

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Greek Mythology never end to amaze me. Not only because it’s psychology in disguise, but further more because it’s so modern, that you could use it to explain today’s society to your children (like Fulvio Terzani, Tiziano’s son, says in his conference about Ultra Marathon).

To say it all, this article was supposed to start with a gengitivis, yes, I wanted to put an example of trauma in our body. The last time I have been at the dentist, he told me that my gums were not infected, but they kept the memory of an ancient gum disease. Oh my gosh, I admit that teeth brushing wasn’t my fave sport until quite late, and that I have been neglecting this must-have habit for too long.

So, how can I send the message to my gums that it’s okay, war is over… or is it? No, it is not. My self defense system is prepared to striking news, at any moment of the day. Consider that, on 13th november, Paris terror attack I was watching Star Wars on streaming. The day after I went to work, as I usually do, by train, and I was taught about the situation (8 attacks, 13 kamikaze, hundred wounded and dead, doctors called back from strike to help with rescue operations) only once over there. Yes, terrorists won their cause, with my brain cells. For me, the real fight starts now, with goals like regaining confidence, trusting other people, and building hope for the future by taking actions (and moving forward from freezing).

Before I go to the topic “14th november” (the awake after attacks), in another article, I would like to finish what I started. Gum disease, I said. Ok, let’s go.

Yarrow-cultivar

Yarrow is commonly called nosebleed or soldier’s woundwort because the juice of its leaves and stem can stop bleeding. Many North American tribes chew the leaves as a remedy for a toothache as well as a number of other ailments. The anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic, effects of yarrow can help with receding gums at any stage.

Sorry, if I skip the part where you are suggested to chew on the leaves and stems or gargling. If you don’t want to mess with the herb, you can use the essential oil of yarrow. This blue-colored oil is very potent, so mix in a few drops of coconut oil or another carrier oil before using it as a gum paint.

If you don’t know where to buy essentiel oils, please, contact me, and I will be happy to give you some ideas, for free.

Yarrow’s latin name, like a thunder lighting, sounded too familiar. Achillea Millefolium… go away. No kidding. Because I am already used to another powerful plant, which helped me with bipolar disease, mood swings, St. Johns Wort, Hypericum perforatum, I am very eager to test this plant on my gums.

Hypericum is worth a full other article, but if you have any questions, don’t miss and go to contact, or leave a comment. Hypericum leaves have got deep wound-healing potential, as anti-depressant, especially in seasonal change.

My Spirit-Self is a being of pure Light.
A shield of radiant light protects me as I travel in Starry worlds.
I learn to trust my own inner Light.
The Sun is shining in my Soul.

crociato-ferito

Now, back to our greek warriors, and PTSD

“Beyond the universal soldier: combat trauma in classical antiquity”, have now retrospectively diagnosed ancient Greek fighters as “traumatised by their experiences of war”.

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American infantrymen grew up in a society based on “Christianised norms and values, stressing peace, mercy and the sanctity of human life”. They largely “served in military units comprised of complete strangers” and often had to fight round the clock for extended periods. They could do little more than “seek safety in cover and concealment” on battlefields “traversed by red-hot, razor-sharp shrapnel and high-velocity gunfire”. Sleep deprivation, lack of social support, enforced passivity in the face of lethal danger and a sense of going against their underlying values all combined to make war deeply traumatic.

None of this, Dr Crowley’s paper goes on, applied to Athenian hoplites. They lived in a “profoundly pugnacious” society that “venerated war”, and where “battlefield bravery” was “considered an unqualified social good”. Soldiers “mobilised, deployed and fought alongside” those from their local communities in “a close-order formation predicated on mutual protection and tactical interdependency”. “Largely protected against progressive exhaustion and sleep deprivation”, they faced a limited range of threats from “warriors armed with muscle-powered weapons”.

All these factors, Dr Crowley’s paper concludes, protected ancient soldiers against the dangers of PTSD. The whole idea of feeling bad after harming an enemy is totally alien to Greek culture,” says Dr Crowley. “Grave markers include tallies of the numbers a soldier has killed, something very hard to imagine today.”

With courtesy of Battle scars: Did Achille suffered from PTSD?