Apprendre à vivre avec": la difficile reconstruction d'un survivant du  Bataclan - Nice-Matin

This week is already anxiogene, because of American elections, yes, and because of Dias de los Muertos. The All Hallows Eve. All saints.

Not only we are heading to Veteran Day, which in Italy – my home Country – makes no sense, so I admit that during 33 years I have been living in a bunker… but also, it’s the 5th anniversary of Bataclan and good fellows. Who are good fellows? The attacks that you don’t remember either because you did not know or read about or you simply forgot. The Stade de France, the terraces, cafes and restaurants on the street, … I am lazy here, and I am not a journalist, that means I will just mention a few.

David was one of the people held as hostage by suicide bombing terrorists after carnage. He went through a trauma recovery after 3 years of psychoterapy, meds, and writing. In fact, I just bought his book, in french, to check similiraties with my story. He was a barman, but his regret is he had to change job and I guess he is now a photographer. Barman is a job that you do to party with people, anybody who works in tourism and leisure activities will confirm that part of the fun is serving people and party with them. Tourism is a leisure profession. He did not feel like partying anymore after shooting, as simple as that.

I am curious to read his story because he comes from Chile. Chile sounds familiar to me. South America led me to France and where I am now. In 2006, I have been in Torres del Paine, the natural park he went back to in order to unwind and decompress. Those views make me feel closer to him. Once he was there, in a tent, with no wifi, he found himself asking himself “what the hell am I doing here?” He felt lost and all demons could find him. It has been a big cleansing time.

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In the aftermath of Bataclan, after the intervention of BRI, the french special forces, David changed his life. He dumped his partner, he found someone more supportive who was able to tell him “we will talk about it when you feel like”. They are married now. His mental health was supported also by the psychoterapist who was able to listen and understand the gravity of his PTSD.

I wish I could translate his story so that you can read it.

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