PTSD Beautiful Trauma

An expulsive cataclysm of the soul

YOUR FAITH IS YOUR FORTUNE.

„Change your conception of yourself and you will automatically change the world in which you live. Do not try to change people; they are only messengers telling you who you are. Revalue yourself and they will confirm the change.“

— Neville Goddard, Your Faith is Your Fortune ( 1941 )

Summer 2013

“When your reputation is broken, then you are set free”

an old german saying

WHITE ROOM ( 1965 )

This song is for a friend departed too fast and too soon. Psychedelic state of the mind. He was a dark angel. And he touched my life. He drank too much, he burnt too much and his back pain led him abusing of painkillers. Sure he was depressive, but aren’t we all here when the night is that dark and seem not to end anymore?

Ciao, Bello. Remember me in the fields of gold.

I’ll wait in this place where the sun never shines
Wait in this place where the shadows run from themselves

You said no strings could secure you at the station
Platform ticket, restless diesels, goodbye windows

I walked into such a sad time at the station
As I walked out, felt my own need just beginning

I’ll wait in the queue when the trains come back Lie with you where the shadows run from themselves

Paris, Pigalle.

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Put National Stationary in your diary, it’s time to celebrate

Here are seven reasons that a pocketbook moleskine is the perfect writer’s notebook:

•It really is small enough to carry in your back pocket.

•It’s very light.

•The pages open wide, but the construction is sturdy, so you don’t risk ripping them off.

•It has an elastic band to mark where you left off.Granted, you may not need it, but it looks cool.

•It offers an internal expandable pocket inside the back cover where you can file mementos such as a piece of newspaper with somethingthat caught your eye, or an evocative photo.

•It feels soft to the touch.

•Every detail has been carefully thought out, up to the rounded corners that seem to caress the inside of your palms.

This is not a journal to write long-winded morning pages, philosophical reasonings, or complete stories. It’s the real writer’s notebook, that is, intended to take quicknotes on the go, which is exactly how artists of the past used it. The makers of the moleskine notebook include a page in eight languages within its expandable pocket. It’s entitled “Culture, imagination, memory, travel, personal identity.”

It was originally produced in France by a bookbinder, and used by artists and writers like Van Gogh, Picasso, and Hemingway. (I’ll confess this pedigree made me partialto the moleskine notebook above other pocket journals.) Travel writer Bruce Chatwin was a big fan. It was him who gave the little black notebook the name “moleskine.” When he found out the maker was going out of business in1986, he went to every stationary store in Paris and bought all the inventory left. Then he wrote about its demise in his book The Songlines. A Milanese publisher brought this perfect little writer’s notebook back to life in 1997 and officially named it “moleskine.”

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Technology is having an impact on children’s handwriting ability. But what does this mean for learning and development?

‘We are not just talking about mechanical skills. We are talking about how children learn.’ Photograph: Alamy Cast your mind back to the most recent thing you’ve written. Maybe it was a document for work, a message to a friend, or a simple shopping list. Did you use a pen? Or did you type it? The decline of writing by hand – particularly among young people and children – has been in the news. Last month, paediatric doctors warned that children were finding it difficult to hold pencils due to excessive use of technology. Letters to Santa are increasingly sent by email, and Cambridge University is piloting the use of laptops instead of pen and paper for selected exams after requests from students. Some academics have noted the “downward trend” in students’ handwriting. But what of the role that handwriting plays in learning and development? And with technology changing how we live and work, what place does handwriting have in the modern classroom? These were the questions put to the teachers, academics and specialists in education and technology at the Guardian’s roundtable event on 27 February.

Children struggle to hold pencils due to too much tech, doctors say

   The delegates noted with interest that everyone at the table had chosen to use pens, not laptops, to make notes. One reason for this could be that writing plays a social role in our lives, said Dominic Wyse, professor of early childhood and primary education at UCL and incoming vice-president, president elect of the British Educational Research Association (BERA). Having a laptop open would be rude in such circumstances, he argued – and he would find it more difficult to engage. The level of engagement involved in writing by hand is important, said Diana Strauss, co-founder of Write Dance Training, which helps children develop their handwriting skills through music. She pointed to recent research carried out in France in which one group of adult learners was told to write notes while another typed them. Those writing by hand were later found to have a deeper level of learning. Advertisement Ros Wilson, founder of Andrell Education’s Big Writing model for teaching writing, described the process of handwriting as “creating a mental picture of the world” and said computer processing did not create the same picture in the brain. This is why teachers encourage children to draw in the sand or water, which embeds learning in the early years, noted Naveed Idress, headteacher of Feversham Primary Academy in Bradford. “You never know what an A is unless you’ve physically drawn it.” In terms of writing in schools, there was agreement that increasing use of computers in university assessments could have a knock-on effect lower down the education system. “One of the concerns is that if you put high-stakes tests onto a computer it changes what schools have to prepare children for,” said Jane Medwell, associate professor at the University of Nottingham and consultant for the Write Your Future campaign. Encouraging children to concentrate on using computers too early might not be in their best interests in terms of development. You never know what an A is unless you’ve physically drawn it

You never know what an A is unless you’ve physically drawn it

Angela Webb, a psychologist and chair of the National Handwriting Association, explained that engagement with the physical environment activated certain areas of the brain and stimulated cognitive development, so picking up a pen has a positive impact not just on literacy but on other disciplines too. One example of this is the way that it helps to develop the muscles needed to sit at a desk for long periods, said Strauss. She said learning to write by hand aided physical coordination, rhythm, stamina and posture. Secondary school students are at risk of physical problems later in life if not taught to sit and write properly. Wyse said that while he would like to see children taught to touch-type early in school, it was rare to find children who had formed their first words on a keyboard. But educators should also be careful not to teach handwriting before students were physically ready, argued Jonathan Rodgers, primary advisory teacher for the Centre for Literacy in Primary Education. He criticised the “rush to mark-make, or to write when they should be mark-making before they have actually been squeezing things and climbing things and hanging from things”. Idress agreed that handwriting should be part of children’s holistic development. One way his school helped itself out of special measures was by focusing on music, which helped build focus and readiness to learn in the children. He believes handwriting gives children similar skills to those gained through music – resilience, creativity and the ability to interact socially. “We are not just talking about mechanical skills here,” he said. “We are talking about how children learn. We are making them ready for life.” Nina Iles, head of EdTech at the British Educational Suppliers Association, said it was important to balance digital and written awareness and for children to be able to express themselves creatively through technology and writing. “The key is learning to do it well,” she said. “Sometimes if a child is struggling with their handwriting, that can be a barrier to them being able to use it effectively to inform and express themselves.” Delegates agreed it was important to achieve “automaticity” – the ability to get letters down automatically – to free up the brain to focus on creativity. But for Guy Merchant, professor of literacy in education at Sheffield Hallam University, this can take place with a keyboard or touchscreen just as well as with a pen. Even letters to Santa go by email now, so why must students write exams with a pen?  

Helen Boden, chief executive of the British Dyslexia Association, said touch-typing can give dyslexic children the kind of automaticity they struggle with when learning to write by hand. Some are wary of putting marks on paper that would be a permanent symbol of their difficulties and are more comfortable with a tablet or computer where making corrections is easier. Technology can also help those with little or no English to interact with their classmates, said Hana Emami, primary school project manager at the National Literacy Trust. Yet she warned that not all young people have good access to computers in their schools or at home, meaning too much emphasis on technology could set up educational inequalities. Teachers can sometimes be wary of technology because it doesn’t always fit with their idea of what educational success is, said Boden. But Merchant insisted digital literacy was essential, especially in a world where means of communication are rapidly diversifying. So is there a balance to be struck in how we teach children to write? For Idress, this is key: making sure we help children choose the right tool for the task in hand – whether that’s a pen, a laptop, or something else.

https://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2018/mar/07/does-being-able-to-write-by-hand-still-matter-in-2018?CMP=share_btn_tw

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Thank you for your Service.

“Yoga? First I am a dude, second I am a soldier.”

Invited to NYC to talk to 9/11 families and firefighters for PTSD.

Dan Nevins is a professional speaker who has been inspiring audiences around the world with his message of perseverance, resiliency and hope for more than a decade. A highly decorated soldier, Dan was severely injured during combat in Iraq in 2004 after an improvised explosive device (IED) detonated beneath his vehicle. He lost both legs below the knee, and lives with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the emotional wounds of war. Dan credits Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) with his successful rehabilitation, which instilled a “can-do” attitude, positive outlook and passion for helping his fellow wounded warriors in him. He quickly became an advocate for the organization, inspiring both his peers and the public to create positive change for themselves and those around them, simply by sharing his powerful story. Dan’s charismatic personality and relatable, lively approach resonated with audiences of all shapes and sizes, and he soon found himself sharing his story with hundreds of thousands of people around the world. In 2008, Dan received WWP’s highest honor, the George C. Lang Award for Courage, for his efforts on behalf of the organization. He went on to become the director of WWP’s Warriors Speak program, where he taught other wounded warriors and their caregivers how to share their stories with the public and serve as spokespeople for the organization, much like he had.

“We all have traumas in life.”

More recently, Dan discovered the life-changing power of yoga, which has enabled him to heal from the invisible wounds of war in a way that nothing else could. He quickly realized that other wounded warriors could benefit from yoga in the same way and knew he had to become an instructor. Dan became a Baptiste Yoga teacher in 2015, and now incorporates the notion of “yoga for every-body” into his speeches and classes, encouraging people from all walks of life – and veterans in particular – to take up the practice. Word of Dan’s efforts spread quickly, and he has been invited to teach yoga throughout the world, from the White House in Washington, DC to the Africa Yoga Project in Nairobi, Kenya. Nowadays, when he’s not leading classes for hundreds of participants, Dan can usually be found sharing his passion for life, WWP, yoga and his fellow wounded warriors with the attendees of major events ranging from the Bank of America 500 at the Charlotte Motor Speedway to the Wisdom 2.0 Summit in San Francisco. However, Dan refuses to rest on his laurels, and is continuously searching for new ways to help other veterans. In late 2015, he decided to take his advocacy work one step further and established the Yodha Foundation. Through the foundation, he is developing the Warrior Spirit Retreat, a non-profit that will empower warriors and their families to greater possibilities by providing them with new tools for healing from the invisible wounds of war. Set on a serene organic family farm in St. Augustine, Florida, the holistic retreat will offer a curriculum centered on yoga, mindfulness and meditation, and will be free of charge to veterans and their families.

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 In the aftermath of terror attacks, in Paris 2015, I knew panic and fear at workplace and PTSD soon started with insomnia, poor emotional intelligence, inability to put words on my own feelings, anxiety and fear of going crazy, exhaustion and chronique fatigue disease, after sleep burn out, tremors (mouth, legs, hands), tachycardia, and short memory loss, just to mention a few. Others symptoms you can’t just describe, like a sort of electrochemical pinching in your veins, especially in legs, or warmth flames in the back, which give you the right sense of burning from the inside out. After 6 months after terror attacks ( from january to june ), I got completely unbalanced, both emotionally, and physically, put on weight, panic attacks, anger outbursts, no way to do my job anymore, like dealing with typical visitors problem solving ( e.g. can’t stand people crying for a lost baggage, or a fully booked restaurant anymore, “damn stop it, please” ). Any yelling, for any reasons, and self defense goes on freeze, fly or fight. Why do people need to shout? COME ON

“IF YOU WERE IN ANY ANOTHER COMPANY YOU WOULD BE OUT”

In february 2016, I was diagnosed definitely inadequate to my position. Until 19th september 2019, when I signed up for a long term deal in the present service for the same Company in which I broke down medically stated on 14th september 2016, after temporary therapeutic part time and several short term missions. Of course, you have to consider a deep cleaning of your personal life, as well as a full transformation of your jobcareer and lifestyle. You can’t figure out coping with PTSD and holding on the same life schedule than before trauma. It involves stop overthinking, letting go, and modulating negative emotional responses compared with the healthy controls.

afghanistan anger anxiety balance belonging break down burn out combat stress coping with ptsd dark night of the soul depression emotional empath empathy fear highly sensitive person homecoming hsp meditation mental health mindfulness out of place out of the box panic paris attacks psychological ptsd resilience sebastian junger self care self discovery self love self worth shell shock social anxiety stress stress disorders suicidal trauma tribe veterans vets war vets weird yoga

This is an incredible find who I have been listening all nights long, during my Journey from the Caterpillar to Cocoon phase.

Whilst you can find all Butterfly process in his channel, one of my milestone is gaining a different understanding and perspective on this bipolar medical condition.

Have been bipolar in my youth, until I mastered my swing moods, with plants, and flowers, and walking, yoga and mindfulness. Please, I am not here telling you to drop your pills, and say to you that we can do it without medicins and psychiatrist.

My message here is YOU ARE THE ONE who can really understand what is going on in your mind and add plus value (spiritual) to your life.

 For the story time, my neighbor went mad a night, in january 2015, while I was struggling with my anxiety, and couldn’t sleep already. He tried to kill her wife for the second time. He also tried to beat a policeman (who was wounded on his head falling in the fight and tapping to a table’s angle), who came at 1 am in the house apart on same flat. The day after, after a sleepless night, I was told from his wife, his story: 25 years medicines plus “smoking” and drinking. So, what would you expect? Complete healing? Bliss? Genius?  

This is a perfect example of what a night dark of the soul means. And I wish Neale Donald Walsh will be back to Paris, to attend his conference, at least once.

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The book which introduced me to Present Moment awareness and taught me that we are not our thoughts. And how I came to better my listen skills, out of judgementIncluding my Inner Voice. This goal was attained only by practice of meditation (10 -20 minutes a day to start from).

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Bonjour les Divers,

Here you get one step further your Self Discovery ; have heard of Empathy? Did you know it is a Super Power? Well, half part of my life I have been struggling this psychic gift, today I am kind of accepting, and let me guide from it. What you need is basically creating a shield ( can be both psychic and physical ) in order to master it and not being destroyed by it. Because I am lazy, I will put you here two of my best speakers I found on my web searching until now. You can subscribe their channels, or just taking what you need at this right moment. And that’s ok.

Blessings.

oh well, they speak alot, if you are sleepless will be perfect….

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Whatever you might think, this is one of my best motivators who have been my GOOD COMPANY during my dark night, when you wake up at 3h00 am right? Or you are still up cos you are burning from the inside out which is also a symptom or you awakening as they say or you drank too much or you’re stressed out or you have nightmares and flashbacks and anxiety and you can’t just get asleep or something terrible might happen before dawn … YOU GOT IT. In my journey, to hell and back, I have investigated plenty of these motivators channels; some of them are copy, you get the title, they put stardust in your eyes, you get blind, and they are simply all the same; they can speak along for 20 minutes without saying anything really effective.

This Man uses a very original language and then you can agree with his choices ( vegan ), or not; but this doesn’t take his value away. You are your choices ( I am flexible on meat but if I can choose I will go vegetarian cos I love it like Indian cuisine ). This post is also a chance for me to thank “Ralph Smart” cos of his vision gift and sharing on the Tube. I am also reorganizing the homepage ( more editorial ) cos I want to make some order on it, and my ideas are becoming more clear. Too messy is not good for you who are coming through for the first time and it’s our first encounter, right? What this mess, well, it’s Me 😊 Enjoy 2020 forecast by this incredible You Tube speaker.

afghanistan anger anxiety balance belonging break down burn out combat stress coping with ptsd dark night of the soul depression emotional empath empathy fear highly sensitive person homecoming hsp meditation mental health mindfulness out of place out of the box panic paris attacks psychological ptsd resilience sebastian junger self care self discovery self love self worth shell shock social anxiety stress stress disorders suicidal trauma tribe veterans vets war vets weird yoga

Discover the 6 life-changing stages of spiritual awakening and learn 3 simple but proven strategies to help you work through each stage, even the harder ones. You may be having a spiritual awakening right now and chances are, you don’t even know what the heck is happening behind the scenes.

  1. Wake up
  2. Bliss
  3. Dark night
  4. Void
  5. Grounding
  6. Purpose and life mission

Work with your heart.

Quiet your mind.

Detach from your mind. You are not your thoughts.

afghanistan anger anxiety balance belonging break down burn out combat stress coping with ptsd dark night of the soul depression emotional empath empathy fear highly sensitive person homecoming hsp meditation mental health mindfulness out of place out of the box panic paris attacks psychological ptsd resilience sebastian junger self care self discovery self love self worth shell shock social anxiety stress stress disorders suicidal trauma tribe veterans vets war vets weird yoga

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