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Maybe it’s you.

ASH RARE BOOKS : CATALOGUE 113

The episode he is mentioning in the video with the guy working at the Four Seasons… I have been working in xxx Hotels for over 8 years, and I LOVED my job. I have been LOVING my job so much to the point that anything out of my job disappeared. My job took over all domains of my life. At first, I tried to keep some relationships outside my workplace, but I finished to drop all of them, and focus on my job.

Funny Pictures Of The Day - 52 Pics | Retro humor, Vintage humor, Sarcastic  humor

Every Christmas Eve I was HAPPY to work at my workplace, because the lights were just perfect, like in any American movie. I was living the dream, except I knew it was all FAKE. My shifts were just horrible and destroying any social relationship, or activities I could do out of my job, but MY JOB was perfect. I didn’t need anything outside it. My health has starting degrading after a few years. I had short nights of sleep, and for more than one year, I have been working in the night shift. I slept over all my three days off. I was in a zombified state of mind. I felt I couldn’t do any better. I was an indipendent woman in her forties, living and paying her bills abroad, alone. I was doing THE JOB of one’s life career in tourism and entertainement, I JUST LOVED IT.

Did I say HOW MUCH I LOVED MY JOB?

I’d better leave you here.

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First Responders First.

I will echo some of Michael’s post from time to time. This is one of those times. His group on FB is very active: First Responders First

As of today (11/12/2020), Law Enforcement Officer suicides alone are at 149 for this year. Last year there were 236 reported Officer suicides. Another 247 Offices have died in the line of duty; bringing the overall total of lives lost to 396 for 2020. So much more must be done to address this ongoing epidemic among our men and women in blue. Know yourself, acknowledge your needs, accept a helping hand when offered and ask for one when needed.Options include:1) Lifeline: Call 800.273.TALK (8255)2) Crisis Text Line: Law enforcement text BLUE to 741741, others text TALK to 7417413) Call 911 for emergencies4) Check with your department for services including peer support5) COPLINE: 1-800-267-54636) Crisis Text Line – Text BLUE to 7417417) Cop2Cop – 1 866-COP-2COP (267-2267)

I’m very excited to announce that Retired Police Sergeant and Former U.S. Air Force Captain Michael Sugrue will be working on a book chronicling his story of trauma, survival and ultimate recovery. He’s teaming up with well known author and world renowned Psychologist Shauna Springer PhD. Michael Sugrue will be the first author and “Doc Springer” will be second. His hope is to further help his fellow first responders, veterans and active military; many suffering in silenceDr. Shauna Springer is a graduate of Harvard University and is one of the world’s leading experts on PTSD, Trauma, and Moral Injury among veterans. She co-hosts a weekly podcast on these topics in collaboration with MilitaryTimes. Her work has been featured on CNN, VICE, Dr. Oz, NPR, NBC, CBS Radio, Forbes, The Philadelphia Tribune, Washington Post, and Military Times. She is a regular contributor to Psychology Today.https://www.docshaunaspringer.com/

First Responder Support Network

Save A Warrior – “SAW”

Let’s all help to smash the stigma!

#ptsi#smashthestigma#mentalhealth#cops#policeofficers#lawenforcement#firstresponders#ois#bluelivesmatter#ptsdawareness#ptsd#ptsisurvivor#ptsi#suicideprevention#smashingthestigma#iwilllisten#resiliency#recoveryispossible#help#backtheblue#traumarecovery#trauma#depression#anxiety#mentalhealthawareness#depression#anxiety#anger#michaelsugrue

Michael Sugrue

Shauna Springer

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Jannine. D-Day veteran meets long-lost French love.

How could I not post this during these overwhelming days?

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World War II Veteran delivers a promise after 73 years.

Marvin Strombo, Rex Ziak

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Marvin Strombo was behind Japanese enemy lines on a Pacific island during World War II when he realized the other five men in his squadron had moved on without him.

The young U.S. Marine, part of an elite scout-sniper platoon fighting a 1944 battle on Saipan, nervously scanned the terrain. He spotted a body on the ground, a dead Japanese soldier lying on his left side. The young man looked peaceful, as if asleep, and something white poked out from his jacket.ADVERTISEMENT

Strombo knelt and pulled out a silk flag, all the space around the bright red emperor’s sun filled with elegant calligraphy. He hesitated, then took the flag and scrambled to reunite with his squadron as they entered the Japanese-held town of Garapan.WWII veteran Marvin Strombo holds up a photo of himself taken during the battle on Saipan with him holding a captured sword and flag. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

More than 70 years later, Strombo is returning the Japanese flag to his fallen enemy’s family. The 93-year-old arrived Friday in Tokyo, the first stop in a 10,000-mile (16,000-kilometer) journey into the remote mountainside to bring the keepsake back to the man’s home village — back to a brother and two sisters who could never say goodbye.

He was met by Japanese news media, who gathered around his wheelchair to interview him.

“I realized there were no bullets or shrapnel wounds, so I knew he was killed by the blast of a mortar,” Strombo recalled in Portland, Oregon, this week before boarding a flight to Japan.

Then, quietly: “I think that soldier wanted me to find him for some reason.”

The flags were a good-luck charm that linked Japanese soldiers to their loved ones and their call for duty. Some were signed by hundreds of classmates, neighbors and relatives.The deceased Japanese soldier’s name is Sadao Yasue and many of the names on the flag, as shown by the markings, contain the same last name. (Rex Ziak/Obon Society via AP)

Allied troops frequently took them from the bodies of their enemies as souvenirs. They have a deep significance because most Japanese families never learned how their loved ones died and never received remains.

For Strombo, the flag hung in a glass-fronted gun cabinet in his home in Montana for years, a topic of conversation for visitors and a curiosity for his four children. He never spoke about his role in the battles of Saipan, Tarawa and Tinian, which chipped away at Japan’s control of islands in the Pacific and paved the way for U.S. victory.

He wrote letters to find out more about the flag but eventually put it aside. He knew no Japanese and, in an era before the internet, making any headway was difficult.

Marvin Strombo

Then, in 2012, the son of his former commanding officer contacted him about a book he was writing on the platoon.

Through him, Strombo reached out to the Obon Society, a nonprofit in Oregon that helps U.S. veterans and their descendants return Japanese flags to the families of fallen soldiers.Obon Society founders Rex and Keiko Ziak. (Rex Zika/Obon Society via AP)

Within a week, researchers found it belonged to Yasue Sadao by reading the script on the flag. They traced the corporal to a tea-growing village of about 2,400 people in the mountains roughly 200 miles (340 kilometers) west of Tokyo.

The calligraphy turned out to be the signatures of 180 friends and neighbors who saw Yasue off to war in Higashi Shirakawa, including 42 of his relatives. Seven of the original signatories are still alive, including Yasue’s 89-year-old brother and two sisters.

When researchers contacted Yasue’s brother by phone, he asked if the person who had his brother’s flag was the same one who found it so many years ago, said Rex Ziak, who co-founded the Obon Society with his Japanese wife, Keiko.

“There was just silence on the line and then he asked, ‘Do you imagine he knows how my brother died and where he died?’” Ziak recounted. “And that’s when we realized that this person is very much alive in that family and this mystery of what happened to him is very much alive.”

Strombo is the only person who can provide those answers. He can roughly show where he found Yasue’s body on the outskirts of Garapan and can tell the siblings that their brother likely died of a concussion from a mortar round.

“I knew he was young because I could see his profile as I bent over him. He was laying on his back, kind of on his left side,” he said.

The Obon Society has returned about 125 flags and gets about five inquiries a day from aging soldiers who regret their actions and want to return the flags before they die.

The group believes thousands of similar flags are likely hidden in attics across the U.S. that could give answers to countless other families. Strombo will be the first World War II veteran to return a flag in person to a Japanese family through the Obon Society.WWII veteran Marvin Strombo is now 93. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

The trip is a journey of forgiveness and closure as he finishes the final chapter of his life.

Only two other men in his platoon of 40 are still alive and he knows the humid islands where he fought for weeks are now a footnote in the war’s larger history.

“It got so I kind of wanted to meet the family, you know,” he said, his voice growing raspy. “I know it means so much to them.”

___

Obon Society: http://www.obonsociety.org

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Old Soldier Meets Young Soldier.

afghanistan anger anxiety awareness belonging break down burn out combat stress coping with ptsd dark night of the soul depression emotional empath empathy fear highly sensitive person homecoming hsp meditation mental health mental illness mindfulness paris attacks post traumatic stress disorders psychological ptsd PTSD AWARENESS ptsd recovery resilience sebastian junger self care self discovery self love self worth shell shock social anxiety spiritual awakening stress stress disorders trauma tribe veterans vets war vets yoga