National Stationary Week

Put National Stationary in your diary, it’s time to celebrate

Here are seven reasons that a pocketbook moleskine is the perfect writer’s notebook:

•It really is small enough to carry in your back pocket.

•It’s very light.

•The pages open wide, but the construction is sturdy, so you don’t risk ripping them off.

•It has an elastic band to mark where you left off.Granted, you may not need it, but it looks cool.

•It offers an internal expandable pocket inside the back cover where you can file mementos such as a piece of newspaper with somethingthat caught your eye, or an evocative photo.

•It feels soft to the touch.

•Every detail has been carefully thought out, up to the rounded corners that seem to caress the inside of your palms.

This is not a journal to write long-winded morning pages, philosophical reasonings, or complete stories. It’s the real writer’s notebook, that is, intended to take quicknotes on the go, which is exactly how artists of the past used it. The makers of the moleskine notebook include a page in eight languages within its expandable pocket. It’s entitled “Culture, imagination, memory, travel, personal identity.”

It was originally produced in France by a bookbinder, and used by artists and writers like Van Gogh, Picasso, and Hemingway. (I’ll confess this pedigree made me partialto the moleskine notebook above other pocket journals.) Travel writer Bruce Chatwin was a big fan. It was him who gave the little black notebook the name “moleskine.” When he found out the maker was going out of business in1986, he went to every stationary store in Paris and bought all the inventory left. Then he wrote about its demise in his book The Songlines. A Milanese publisher brought this perfect little writer’s notebook back to life in 1997 and officially named it “moleskine.”